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20120928
20121006
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of the people who are some form of religion in this country are christians, so you can say anything you want, i suppose, and get away with it. but not really so, a christian nation, because the first amendment to the u.s. constitution separates church and state. however, i always like to say, "well, in some senses, it's a christian nation, but it most certainly is a jewish nation, because that whole creation, liberation, exodus, making of a holy land - we've got towns around here called zion or new canaan or whatever - what the whole drama - and again, i'm not making this up, folks, as dave barry would say - the ministers on the boats, like the arabella , coming into the plymouth colonies, actually gave sermons that replicate or bring out the whole old testament drama, so we get a feel of these kinds of things there. let me move - before we take a couple of questions here - i want to get to our rabbi bronstein, because what makes this class work is you don't have to listen to some religious studies professor talk about somebody else's religion; you can listen to the real thing. and in this case
learn here in all of the great religions of the world. and i think also that there are specific things that are taught here that are not taught anywhere else, and that you can't find in the other religions. for example, the breath technique itself, it's not really one that has been found - the closest thing to it is hatha yoga, from what i understand from religious experts. and there is something called the blue body which ramtha teaches, a blue body healing technique, which deals with some of the higher, subtler energies in the body that are available to us, and we've had remarkable healings occur with people, from this work, and that's something that's not taught anywhere either. >> yogis - yeah, they do use yoga for healing, quite phenomenally, and the tibetan medicine men also use those kinds of techniques. >> oh, right. no, i'm not saying that they don't; i'm saying the blue body healing technique is not - it's not a yoga technique. >> not that particular one. >> right, that one. >> i might jump in also and say that jz has become comfortable, through ramtha's guidance, using the t
everything that there is to know or even a tiny bit of what there is to know about any given religion - it's to give us the skills so if you are interested in going on further, that you'll be able to pursue it, so that's the key there. before taking a couple more questions, we are actually kind of waving good-bye to our first dimension as we move down the pike. but good-bye's not the same - we want to keep these dimensions together. we're going to - i'm kind of excited - we're going to move into myth in particular, but myth and ritual, and in this class, i want to talk about the relationship of myth, ritual, and include religious experience, so we're going to be doing that also. but before launching into this great leap into the next segment of the course, i just want to take a few more questions on buddhism, or comments or insights that you had. yeah? >> when i think of christianity or judaism, i think of community, families - the thing with hinduism and buddhism are the men seem isolated from the women, and the men are social people; it seems - i want the family to be brought into it, i
religion. the hui themselves don't see it that way. they see themselves as the descendants of the earliest muslims in china, who were arabs, persians, turks, some mongolian muslims and others. narrator: geographer chai yangwei grew up near here. he returned to china to attend beijinuniversity. day in lanzhou, he's back exploring hui culture in a wholesale market. spichas alwa been on of theost important prodts tradedt the maet. chaiangw meetseen on wi ma zhenan, a hui muslim. ma is a spice trader. manyf these spices were brought over the silk road from the west from as far away as the uighur autonomous region,r qingi. a han chinese couple come to purchase tea. it is of high quality, so they buy a whole box. ( gro(pspeaking chineseh)nese ) translator: i used to be a laborer, but i steeled myself to make the move and become a trader. at first i sold fur and wool-- very traditional for a muslim trader. now, though, i buy spice from the west. sometimes i go to tibet to buy my spices. the furs i get from as far away as russia. narrator: ma lives with his fami in a muslim residential district. t
culture from top to bottom, from the economy and technology up to the religion. the problem is that what we find in the field as data is primarily information on technology, on the material culture. you find buildings and pot shards and stone tools and things like that. so how do you move from that data to the organization of society and then to their religion and these other aspects of culture ? and there is only one way to do that. and that is to go to living populations, living cultures that are being studied by ethnographers, by our colleagues in cultural anthropology, and use them as analogies. keach: in the 1970s, anthropologists documented a society called the kawelka in the highlan of papua new guinea. the kawelka society numbers about 1,000. they could be either a tribe or a chiefdom, because the population limits defining social types are not fixed. here in the highlands, people raise sweet potatoes and pigs. like the first residents of copan, no one here has acquired great individual wealth. but men like ongka can acquire great prestige and influence. such leaders are called "
of other people. keach: their religion sanctioned conquest, but that was not enough for the aztecs. they also rewrote their history to clothe themselves in the mantle of divine authority. sanders: the uncle of the aztec ruler came to him and said, "i think we should burn the books. "they only deceive the common people. "and let's write true history --" meaning official history, of course. and this history tells the story of a chosen people -- it's very much like the story of the israelites -- a chosen people who start up in northern mexico at a place called aztlan -- that's where they got their name "azteca" from -- start in aztlan under the leadership of a leader who later on becomes their god, huitzilopochtli, but at that time he was a human being. he tries to tell them to keep going, keep going. they haven't reached the promised land yet. finally, they arrive in the valley of mexico, and on an island in the lake they see an eagle land with a serpent in its claws on a nopal cactus. and huitzilopochtli says that's the place that you are destined to form your great kingdom, and you
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6